About dress codes (and monks)

Around here we say l’abito non fa il monaco (lit.: robes don’t make the monk), but apparently Italians do judge books by their covers, or monks by their robes — and people by the clothes they wear.

A few days ago at work we were encouraged to dress appropriately in order to be taken seriously, especially if we are to teach in a business environment. Apparently if you look young, and even worse you are a woman, people won’t take you seriously, so you should make an effort to… look the part?

I don’t want to shoot the messenger, we were told so because people in this area do think this way, so it makes business sense to do what the client expects. Still, I found it depressing, and to be honest a bit disturbing, especially at a time when we are fighting for inclusion.

Or maybe it’s just me being too naive. In real life, when clients meet you they will not see your professionalism, but the trousers you’re wearing. They will not be impressed by your teaching skills, but by the height of your heels.

This is all so sad. 😔

3 thoughts on “About dress codes (and monks)

Add yours

  1. Hello again!

    Here in Japan it is the same and it is common in some jobs to teach kids with lots of physical games while wearing a suit.

    I was once told “You should dress to be the smartest in the room.” I try to dress smartly but I wonder if it is only to cover up my social awkwardness!

    Thanks for this. It’s rarely covered in books and stuff. Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The problem is, I don’t like to dress smart, i don’t own smart clothes and I don’t feel comfortable travelling around all day un high heels.
      It’s mostly my problem, but i wish I wasn’t forced to look like the person I’m not, that’s all.

      Liked by 1 person

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